Details

    • Type: Improvement Improvement
    • Status: Closed Closed
    • Priority: Major Major
    • Resolution: Fixed
    • Component/s: New Entries
    • Labels:
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    • Number of attachments :
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      Description

      arugula (AmE) n
      (Bot) (Eruca saliva) ruca

      ruca nf
      (Bot) (Eruca saliva) arugula (AmE?)

      Curiosament jo sempre havia sentit a dir rúcula, que és la versió portuguesa o italiana (rucola), no ruca.

        Activity

        Hide
        Linda Oxnard added a comment -

        I think the British tend to say 'rocket' instead of 'arugula'. When I said 'arugula' to James he had no idea what I was talking about. When I said 'rocket that you eat' he knew exactly what I meant.

        I'm not sure whether to mark 'arugula' as American or not. It is also widely used in Australia (I seem to remember that was the term which used to appear in greengrocers and supermarkets there) and I think the term is reasonably well known in the UK (at least amongst foodies). Perhaps:

        arugula n
        (Bot) (Eruca Saliva) ruca <catnote>La paraula més usada en anglès britànic és 'rocket'.</catnote>

        ruca nf
        (Bot) (Eruca saliva) arugula / rocket (Br.)

        Show
        Linda Oxnard added a comment - I think the British tend to say 'rocket' instead of 'arugula'. When I said 'arugula' to James he had no idea what I was talking about. When I said 'rocket that you eat' he knew exactly what I meant. I'm not sure whether to mark 'arugula' as American or not. It is also widely used in Australia (I seem to remember that was the term which used to appear in greengrocers and supermarkets there) and I think the term is reasonably well known in the UK (at least amongst foodies). Perhaps: arugula n (Bot) (Eruca Saliva) ruca <catnote>La paraula més usada en anglès britànic és 'rocket'.</catnote> ruca nf (Bot) (Eruca saliva) arugula / rocket (Br.)
        Hide
        Max Wheeler added a comment -

        I confirm James's intuition. I am a regular eater of rocket, but I'd never heard of "arugula", so I assumed it was some quite unfamiliar plant. "Arugula" is not in Collins English Dict millennium edition nor a couple of other English dictionaries near to hand. "Rocket" is sometimes written "roquet" or "roquette".

        Show
        Max Wheeler added a comment - I confirm James's intuition. I am a regular eater of rocket, but I'd never heard of "arugula", so I assumed it was some quite unfamiliar plant. "Arugula" is not in Collins English Dict millennium edition nor a couple of other English dictionaries near to hand. "Rocket" is sometimes written "roquet" or "roquette".

          People

          • Assignee:
            Linda Oxnard
            Reporter:
            Jaume Ortolà i Font
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            Dates

            • Created:
              Updated:
              Resolved: